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Scout

Handbook


Revision 2014-03-04




















1. Introduction 

This Handbook has been prepared especially for the Parents and Scouts of Troop 1409. It tells you what Scouting can do for your son and how we do it. It will help guide you to a fuller understanding and appreciation of Scouting, and to the realization that you will benefit fully only by giving fully. It gives an outline of requirements, outdoor programs, financial operations, uniform and equipment, troop organization, and advancement. Keep it for handy reference during your association with Troop 1409.

2. Mission Statement 

The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law. 

3. Vision Statement 

The Boy Scouts of America will prepare every eligible youth in America to become a responsible, participating citizen and leader who is guided by the Scout Oath and Law. 

4. Charter Organization 

The Wells Branch Homestead Association sponsors Boy Scouts of America Troop 1409. It is a part of the Blackland Prairie District of the Capital Area Council, Boy Scouts of America. 

5. Organization 

The Troop is organized with a Scoutmaster, Assistant and Junior-Assistant Scoutmasters, a troop level Senior Patrol Leader and Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, and Patrols of not more than eight Scouts each. 

Each Patrol is composed of the patrol level Senior and Assistant Senior Patrol Leaders, Patrol member scouts and any invited Senior Scouts. 

Scouts can also hold non-leadership positions in the troop that include: Scribe, Librarian, Quartermaster, Historian and Web Reporter. Scouts can also be Den Chiefs for Cub Scout Pack Dens. 

Two First Class scouts are encouraged each year to attend National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT). NYLT training is an intensive weeklong leadership school offered by the Council. The troop will offer partial scholarships to encourage participation in this program. 

Key to scouting is the patrol method. Patrols are the building blocks of a Boy Scout troop. A patrol is a small group of boys who are similar in age, development, and interests. Working together as a team, patrol members share the responsibility for the patrol's success. They gain confidence by serving in positions of patrol leadership. All patrol members enjoy the friendship, sense of belonging, and achievements of the patrol and of each of its members.



6. Scout Participation

Each Scout of Troop 1409 is expected to participate in at least 75% of the Troop activities until he reaches Senior Scout status (14 years old or Star rank and above). Our Troop Committee has learned that only the Scouts that attend regularly receive the full value of the Scouting program. Also, without regular attendance his fellow patrol and troop members are penalized in all their team activities. The Troop Committee has established the policy that a Scout who misses three consecutive months of meetings is subject to review and possible deletion from the Troop roster. Participation in the Troop’s outdoor activities are essential to a boy's membership in the Troop. 

7. Requirements For Joining The Troop 

The requirements for a boy to become a Scout are that he has completed fifth grade or meet the basic knowledge and commitment requirements, and be at least 11 years but not more than 18 years old. His completed application form should be submitted with the following fees: 
  • Initial annual dues are currently $60. First year dues include: Scout Handbook, neckerchief, neckerchief slide, and Registration - as prescribed by National Council. 
  • Dues for subsequent years are currently $100. 
  • Completed BSA Scout Application (for annual re-chartering) 
  • Parts A and B of the BSA Medical Form are to be completed at least annually by participants in all Scouting events. This health history, parental/ guardian informed consent and release agreement, and
talent release statement is to be completed by the participant and parents/guardians. Attach a copy of both sides of your insurance card. Part C is the pre-participation physical exam that is required for participants in any event that exceeds 72 consecutive hours, for all high-adventure base participants, or when the nature of the activity is strenuous and demanding. 
  • Program cost can be offset by participation in fundraising activities.
8. Adult Participation 

Troop 1409 will continue to thrive only with the active interest and participation of interested adults, particularly the parents of individual Scouts. There is usually a marked relationship between parent's participation and the Scout's achievements. Each Scout is required to have one parent registered as a member of the Troop Committee and will be assigned to a subcommittee fitting their interest. Parents are required to actively contribute to troop activities.

The Troop Committee is composed of Scout parents and subcommittee chairs. Its function is to act as the board of directors of the Troop, and through its members is directly involved in advancement, equipment, facilities, finance and records, leadership, membership, and outdoor programs.
  • All the above matters must be the concern of the Committee, to allow the Scoutmasters the time to work directly with the Scouts. 
  • In addition to the committee meeting a general parents meeting is held the second Sunday of each month at 3:30 P.M. This is an opportunity for parents to become familiar with the direction of the troop and to begin participating in various sub-committees that offer support to the operation of the troop. 
  • Adults are expected to become Merit Badge Counselors for their unique areas of expertise. 
  • Completed BSA Scout Application (for annual re-chartering). Forms can be found on the Troop and BSACAC websites. 
  • Parts A and B of the BSA Medical Form are to be completed at least annually by participants in all Scouting events. This health history, parental/ guardian informed consent and release agreement, and
talent release statement is to be completed by the participant and parents/guardians. Attach a copy of both sides of your insurance card. Part C is the pre-participation physical exam that is required for participants in any event that exceeds 72 consecutive hours, for all high-adventure base participants, or when the nature of the activity is strenuous and demanding. Forms can be found on the Troop and BSACAC websites. 
  • Each participating parent will be required to complete a minimum of the BSA Youth Protection Training (YPT), which is renewal annually. We highly recommend that you the Texas classroom BSA Youth Protection Training, which is renewed every two years. The classroom YPT is required for adults volunteering at camps with overnight stays. 

9. Financial Operations 

Dues and fundraising provides individual, patrol, and troop awards; food for weekend campouts; insurance; equipment repair and replacement and other incidental expenses. Long-term camping fees and expenses and special activities fees are assessed separately. The Troop's primary money raising projects are the Annual M.U.D. Fourth Fest, Scout Spaghetti Dinner, and Movies in the Park, managed by the Troop Committee. Each Scout without exception is required to share in these projects. These funds are used to fund Scout accounts that in turn can be used for camps, program costs and the purchase of new equipment.

10. Transportation

Transportation is essential for the camping program and is arranged for by the Troop Committee. A transportation coordinator will send out an annual schedule and processes the council travel permit. The travel permit requires identification of the automobiles to be used and insurance limits.

11. Advancement

The activities program of the Troop are planned with regular advancement in scouting ranks put into consideration. The learning necessary to complete the advancement requirements give the Scout the chance to develop "Strong in character, a healthy in body, skillful with his hands, and keen of mind, ready to be of help to other people.” (Baden-Powell).

To this end, frequent Boards of Review are conducted by the Troop Leaders Council to determine a Scout's progress. The Scout Handbook discusses in detail all requirements for advancement, and should be referred to constantly by Scouts and parents.

The Troop employs several online methods of keeping records of Scout Advancements and Awards. The primary method is “ScoutBook”. Parents and leaders will be invited to the online program and are expected to utilize this system to track the progress of their scouts. Parents without ready access to a computer or Internet service can request access to printed reports of a scout’s progress.

12. Troop And Patrol Equipment

Patrols are supplied with cooking kits and ample equipment, (Dutch oven, frying pan, etc.) for patrol cooking. These items of equipment are the property of the Troop and have been paid for by the efforts of the Scouts. Any equipment issued to a Scout is to be returned to the troop Quartermaster. Damaged or lost items must be repaired or replaced by the responsible Scout.

13. Troop Library

In the Troop Library, there is a selection of Merit Badge pamphlets. These may be checked out on the same basis as a Public Library. Scouts can also refer to meritbadge.org for a complete listing of merit badge requirements and worksheets.